Science Notebook Workshop August 12, 2015

Foss Science Notebook Overview

Some ideas starting off the year, Science Notebooks

Science Notebook Entry Types


http://thesciencepenguin.com/2013/08/science-notebook-picture-rubric.html

ENTRY TYPES


DEFINITIONS

EXAMPLES

ASSESSMENTS
& RUBRICS

Drawings

Definition
Student generated drawings of materials, scientific investigation set-up, observations, or concepts. Three common types of drawings used in science notebooks include:
  1. 1. Sketches: Informal pictures of objects or concepts created with little detail.
  2. 2. Scientific Illustrations: Detailed, accurate, labeled drawings of observations or concepts.
  3. 3. Technical Drawings: A record of a product in such detail that someone could create the product from the drawings.




Purpose
Students use drawings to make their thinking and observations of concrete or abstract ideas visible. Drawings access diverse learning styles, allow entry to the writing process for special needs students and emergent writers, and assist in vocabulary development (e.g. oral explanations, group discussions, labels).


Tables, Charts, Graphs

Definition
Formats for recording and organizing data, results, and observations.


Purpose
Students use tables and charts to organize information in a form that is easily read and understood. Recording data in these forms facilitates record keeping. Students use graphs to compare and analyze data, display patterns and trends, and synthesize information to communicate results.


Graphic Organizers

Definition
Tools that illustrate connections among and between ideas, objects, and information. Examples include, but are not limited to, Venn diagrams, “Box–and-T” charts, and concept maps.




Purpose
Graphic organizers help students organize ideas to recognize and to communicate connections and relationships.


Notes and Practice Problems

Definition
Tools that illustrate connections among and between ideas, objects, and information. Examples include, but are not limited to, Venn diagrams, “Box–and-T” charts, and concept maps.




Purpose
Graphic organizers help students organize ideas to recognize and to communicate connections and relationships.


Reflective and Analytical Entries

Definition
A record of a student’s own thoughts and ideas, including, but not limited to initial ideas, self-generated questions, reflections, data analysis, reactions, application of knowledge to new situations, and conclusions.







Inserts

Definition
Inserts are artifacts placed within a notebook, including, but not limited to photographs, materials (e.g. flower petals, crystals, chromatography results), and supplemental readings (e.g. newspaper clippings).


Purpose
Students use inserts to document and to enrich their learning.

Purpose
Students use reflective and analytical entries to think about scientific content from their own perspective, make sense of data, ask questions about their ideas and learning processes, and clarify and revise their thinking.


Investigation Formats

Definition
Scaffolds to guide students through a controlled investigation, field investigation, or design process. Examples include, but are not limited to investigation planning sheets or science writing heuristics.




Purpose
Students use investigation formats to guide their thinking and writing
while they design and conduct investigations. Students also use these formats to reflect on and discuss their findings and ideas.


Writing Frames

Definition
Writing prompts used to focus a student’s thinking. Examples include, but are not limited to, “I smelled…I felt…I observed…”,“My results show…”, “The variable I will change is…”, or “I think that because…”.






Purpose
Students use frames to organize their ideas, prompt their thinking, and structure their written response. Frames help students become more proficient in scientific writing and less reliant upon the prompts.